ANGER


When you feel anger, don’t dismiss it or shame it. Acknowledge anger as the message it is. Emotions send messages, information that we need. Anger can tell us something needs to change; anger warns of injustice. Anger spurred such changes as important as the civil rights movement. Anger in the mind of someone skilled at its interpretation: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. So, we can practice being skilled, as well. When you feel it, realize it is a feeling, and that its message is that something needs to change, or to be addressed. Now, use your skillful mind to discern: what is your skillful, contributory approach? Practice, practice.

 

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AGAIN WITH THIS TOPIC?

Forgiveness,  a much talked about, written about topic – maybe it is exhausted by now?   I’m going to give it a shot.

I was raised, in very younger years – by my family, in a rather severe  Christian tradition.  Taught all the doctrine of  some particularly rigid churches I attended at the time; and, at that time, believed it.  Over the years, peace and forgiveness didn’t seem to come according to the rules and regs I was taught.  It did not work for me.  In fact, I seemed to be  in a state of inner turmoil and conflict, judging and damning myself continually.  What to do then?  (Not  a knock on Christianity, just my experience – I love and admire people whose faith brings the best out in them, and to them).

Then, an insight that had been with me, finally dawned.   For me,   I had to let go of all the doctrine of the  past, and look at the knowledge and wisdom available to me N-O-W.   A simple thing.  Isn’t it usually, when it comes down to it?  Maybe lay that concept of forgiveness aside, and go with me here.  Could you do it like this:  Know a thing, a person, a concept for what it is PERIOD.   See the truth, and accept it  as it is.

If a person has injured you in some way: physically, emotionally, financially, whatever way in which you feel injured – see the person for who they are.  Are they, in most of your dealings with them:  kind, considerate, compassionate, thoughtful, and it was just their turn, in that moment,  to be the jerk?   Remember, we all are up for ‘jerk day’, we have them.   If so, let it go.  Each time the thought arises in your mind, you have the power not to entertain it, not to ruminate – up to you.  The less you entertain it, the weaker it becomes – soon, you won’t recall it easily anymore.  If, however, injury is the character of the person, on a rather consistent basis  –  well, there you have it.  There’s your answer.  You can examine the issue, decide whether speaking to them would be of benefit;  or, accept that they are telling and showing you who they are.  What do you want to do about that?  You don’t have to get even, hate, gossip about, avenge yourself – no, you don’t have to do a thing.  You can decide where to put your attention; where to give your time, love and effort.  Simple as that.  What is, is.

There are painful experiences in the world.  We add the suffering.  It’s a choice.

Thanks for stopping by.  Lilie